Blog Archives

Talking in Bed

Talking In Bed by Philip Larkin

Talking in bed ought to be easiest
Lying together there goes back so far
An emblem of two people being honest.

Yet more and more time passes silently.
Outside the wind’s incomplete unrest
builds and disperses clouds about the sky.

And dark towns heap up on the horizon.
None of this cares for us. Nothing shows why
At this unique distance from isolation.

It becomes still more difficult to find
Words at once true and kind
Or not untrue and not unkind.

Being in bed with someone who you love is meant to be easy.

This poem always makes me worry about about a permanent relationship with someone. Is it safe to say that when things get here it’s time to leave? Or is this the time to work super hard? Being in bed with someone else is completely opposite to isolation, well it should be. You are at your most vulnerable, physically and emotionally, it should be easy to be honest. But sometimes it isn’t easy. Sometimes being next to the  same person every night can be the most uncomfortable and difficult thing in the world.

Mirrors Under Notes

My heart melted when I saw this.

Love is getting home to a note on your bathroom mirror after a tough day.

It’s knowing that that’s the first place I go when I get home from work.

It’s still loving me enough after 4 years to write a note before leaving in the morning.

Most relationships start out with all sorts of lovey-dovey stuff in the beginning. Ours didn’t.

The butterflies-in-your-tummy start to a relationship doesn’t really need those flowers.

It’s the 4 years on during

the do-you-still-love-me times

that need the little reminders.

ok

Fear gripped her heart

Fear gripped her cold icy heart as she strolled past the shop windows. The jewels behind that clean sparkly glass made her worry that she might be too old for this fear.

2012. A leap year. A year which traditionally meant that women who were getting antsy could pop the question. Last week a plumpish blonde woman proposed at the Lions game.

But the fear was real. These past few weeks have proven to her why she should be afraid. Love turns downward. It reaches a bottom. A bottom she is worried she might not be able to live with peacefully. She has expectations of her life. Her life should be a certain way. She deserves a certain measure of happiness.

Marriage might mean that measure is more like a ration.

Marriage might mean kids. Marriage might mean teenagers. She has enough teenagers everyday.

Can she live with being happy on Wednesdays and Saturdays only? Is she happy all the days of the week now?

For emergencies only

The Problem is in the Dip

So I have been completing my Psychology course and in the course of my course I have registered for a module on adult development and aging.  Well according to my textbook * marriage is an essential part of adult development.  An interesting discussion I recently read was about marital satisfaction.  What the book says is that after performing extensive studies with many hundreds of married couples covering a range of age groups, marital satisfaction seemed to follow a U-shaped curve.  So imagine a U.  It has a steep decline and then it rises again.  According to this study this is exactly the same shape that satisfaction in marriage takes.

Steep on both sides.

Imagine dividing your married life up into 3 sections.  You get the early years, the middle years and the later years.  In the early years with the arrival of children marital satisfaction declines in a steep way.  Apparently the longer a couple have been married the more unhappy they tend to be.  This is in the first 20 to 24 years of marriage.  During the middle years when you are experiencing your so called mid-life crisis, and your kids are going through the joyous teenage years then marital satisfaction hits rock bottom.  What fantastic timing.  No wonder people like me aren’t that keen on this whole marriage thing.  Well there is hope.  After this rock bottom in marital satisfaction is reached, marital satisfaction begins improving.  In the later years, couples are more likely to describe their marriage as satisfying.  And in fact many older adults who have remained married say that their marriage is better than is had ever been (Papalia, Sterns, Feldman & Camp, 2007).

Now this is the kind of information that would make me take the leap.  I know it sounds a little bit strange that I would decide to get married based on this type of information but knowing that it will be hard in the beginning but it is almost guaranteed to get better later makes me feel much more secure.  This is the type of realistic view I like to enter into things with.  Expecting roses and champagne all the time and cuddles and kisses are unrealistic.  Those are the types of expectations which are the most likely to cause a great deal of unhappiness.  Going in with eyes wide open is the one thing that can ensure I don’t become a divorce statistic.  I would rather have my expectations of hard work and perhaps a decline in satisfaction crushed than more romantic expectations.  When our parents and their parents talk about marriage it’s meant to be this amazing experience that is supposed to complete one.  But apparently it’s not.

Source:

Papalia, D.E, Sterns, H.L, Feldman, R.D & Camp, C.J. (2007). Adult Development and Aging. McGraw-Hill: New York.

Honey, I’m home!

Ok I’m back after a long long holiday in which I was too busy to think much or do much except make it to tomorrow.  Ok it wasn’t really a holiday just a long peep into what my future may be like.  Teaching Prac! Whoop whoop!  Loved it.  Big kids (14-18 year olds)  are not the monsters that the media portray them to be!  They are actually fairly human and completely capable of mature thought and action, although they don’t always choose that way.  So 5 weeks of what I thought would be hell turned into 5 weeks of waking up early every day with a huge smile on my face.  Ready to face the traffic.  Ready to face just about anything, as long as I got to be in the classroom.  Friday was my last day, and 4 (working) days on, I miss it like I’ve never missed anything in my life.

 

Perception is really the key issue here.  I thought teaching big kids would be tough, challenging and full of horror.  It was tough and challenging, but it was not full of horror.  Maybe being married will be like that too.  I think that it will be tough, challenging and full of all sorts of horrific things.  Things like self sacrifice, monotony and even misery.  But what if it won’t be like that at all?  There is the faint possibility that I could wake up next to my husband (ignoring heart palpitations) every morning with a huge smile on my face.  Ready to face the big kids.  Ready to face the staff room politics.  Ready to do just about anything as long as I got to spend my life with my amazing man.  

 

Bad days were part and parcel of teaching prac.  It wasn’t all smooth sailing.  There were days when I left school, got to work (after prac) and I felt like crying.  I felt so disheartened that I wasn’t getting through, that classroom discipline is not as easy as I originally thought, but I knew that the next day would be better.  And it was.  I am sure that there will be bad days in any marriage,  in fact well done if you haven’t had any yet.  (Just check for inner seething in your spouse from all the bloody compromising they’ve had to do to keep you happy.)  It’s about making a decision and sticking with it.

 

It is not impossible to decide to be happy.

Let’s do it!

On Friday this really strange feeling came over me.  I was baking scones and as I worked the dough with my hands kneading it smooth and then cutting star shapes out of it, I thought about how much I’d like to build a life with Hennie.  Maybe even get married. 

I was thinking that maybe it wouldn’t be as bad as I think to get married.  What would I have to look forward to?  Seeing Hennie everyday.  Some days it might be tiresome, I know this from the last time I lived with a man, but at least I am aware of this and I won’t be surprised by it if it happens this time.  I would get the chance to make Hennie feel special every single day.  Little notes in his lunch, or tucked up in his towel which he’ll find when he climbs out the shower.  To be able to greet him with a huge smile and a giant hug when he gets home.  To be greeted by the same thing when I get home.  I don’t really need to be married to do this.  Kids.  I may not want to be a wife, but I do know that I want to be a mom.  I know that I don’t really need to be married to have kids but in some ways it might be better if I am.  I know that society tends to be super harsh to single moms and kids of single moms.  Which is unfair.  But I don’t want my kids to be judged for my decisions.

Then I got to thinking about how simple life was before the advent of technology and, dare I say it, awareness.  Awareness that women can be and can have more than what society says we need and can do.  The way I imagine life was back then before women wanted “it all” was a great happy woman, perhaps slightly unfulfilled, baking, humming, cleaning and looking after children.  Her chief concerns were making sure that her family was happy by managing the household in a conscientious way.  I mean wouldn’t it be great to run around in kitten heels and dresses everyday?  I would love to only need to worry that my sewing was up to date and the supper would be waiting for him when Hennie gets home.  Yes it does sound boring and I feel somewhat guilty for wondering what this might be like.  The last time I wondered what things might be like, my parents started arguing and the epic 10 year divorce ensued.  I certainly do not want that to happen again.  Of course it doesn’t work that way anyone can tell you that!

Is being a wife really a full time job?  Is being a husband a full time job?  I know that if one tries to do “it all” by themselves when there is a perfectly able person there to help then it probably can take up a lot of time.  I know that “my homemaking” responsibilities will have to be shared.  There is just no way that I can be a good mom, wife, sister, friend, employee, aunty and daughter if I try to do everything by myself.  There are a few practical considerations to be thought of before one starts planning the wedding that’s for sure!

I’ve always wanted to build a life with Hennie but to think about marriage in this way is strange for me.  Who knows?  Let’s not get ahead of ourselves!